Trondheim Walks: Strindamarka

View from Estenstadmarka

Undoubtedly the greatest benefit of being a freelancer is the ability to structure your working week however you want. I travel frequently for work but last week I was in Trondheim all week (a rarity these days!) and as such, was able to finish all my scheduled work by Thursday evening.

To reward myself, I took Friday off!

I was discussing the impending doom of the early winter with a few people earlier in the week. One of the worst aspects for a non-skier like me, is feeling confined to the indoors. Unless you're zooming between cabins on sticks, the weather is generally unwelcoming.

Itt dawned on me after reading the local rag's prediction of a late snowfall this year, I need to make the most of the autumn while it's still here! After enjoying the walks around Bymarka and Ladestien this summer, I chose to head south-east and into the forest that's walking distance from our flat – Strindamarka.

Trondheim Estenstadmarka

Sign in the forest

I chose to (broadly) follow a trail outlined on UT.no that starts and ends at Lohove, the terminus of the no.5 bus. It takes you around the area known as Estenstadmarka, up a few steep hills (more than the height profile on the website suggests!), past a couple of lakes and onto the Estenstadhytta. Although it's only open at weekends, Estenstadhytta seemed a good place to aim for, high-up, benches outside and shelter if necessary.

It wasn't necessary – the weather was glorious! Glorious hiking weather anyway. Five degrees above freezing with almost no wind and a burning hot sun when not shaded by the trees. Despite the mild weather and lack of snow, frost has crept up on us and it was visible across the forest.

Frosty forest in Norway

Trondheim Strindamarka

Like in Bymarka, navigating wasn't as straightforward as I expected given there were signs everywhere, so I didn't follow the UT map to the letter. I spent some time exploring the area around the Tømmerholtdammen and Estenstaddammen artificial lakes, trying (and failing) to help some lost Norwegians. Yes, lost Norwegians! It just goes to show they're not all born with an in-built GPS after all 😉

Tømmerholtdammen

After another steep incline I made it to Estenstadhytta. There's an excellent view over Trondheim, albeit obscured by trees and power lines so photos don't really capture it well. The cabin looks a cozy place to stop – I'll have to come back on a summer weekend – and I wasn't the only walker taking a break on its benches.

Estenstadhytta

View across Trondheim from Estenstadhytta

The walk back was a welcome change – down some really steep slopes! I passed many elderly Norwegians out for a stroll, I sure hope I'm capable of such walks when I'm in the prime of my life…

I took a shorter route back through the forest to the Stokkanhaugen estate, just east of the NTNU Dragvoll campus. Me and Gerry are contemplating buying a house next year (more on that soon!), so I take every opportunity I have to take a look at different areas.

Stokkanhaugen

All in all, a really nice day off! Winter can stay away as far as I'm concerned 🙂

Long shadows

Norway Weekly Email Newsletter

You might like

About the Author: David Nikel

Originally from the UK, David now lives in Trondheim and was the original founder of Life in Norway back in 2011. He now works as a freelance writer for technology companies in Scandinavia.

1 Comment

  1. That is a magnificent place. I am also interested in moving over there and concentrate on my own writing and was told that this is the best place to get your creative juices flowing. How did you decide to make a move and was it easy transition from the UK over there

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *